DigiSpark helps monitoring a log file

At work there was a problem with a tool that archives documents. Whenever that tool failed doing its task it would write an error code into a database table.
So some unfortunate user had to check that table for that error code about three times a day, would open that document in Word, save it and update the error code.

I got the order to write a program to automate the whole process. I used c#/.NET for the whole thing. The Task Scheduler would call this program every five minutes and would write its findings into a log.

Because I tested it I was pretty confident it would work smoothly. But what happened now was this: I would check the log regularly if my program picked up the wrong documents and corrected it. Instead of somebody checking the database for errors I would now check the log for the error indications!

So I wrote a second program – again in c#. It would check the log file and if it detected that the tool picked up and fixed a defect document it would then blink the DigiSpark‘s RGB led and turn from green to red. For this I used DigiStump’s DigiRgb.exe basically the same way I used it in my Minecraft mod.

I love it: It saves me a big amount of time of checking a log for something that hardly ever happens. Plus: It looks really cool on my desk 🙂

DigiSpark with RGB shield

DigiSpark indicating that all is good. If it detects an error log it blinks red ten times and then stays red until manually reset.

 

Primo Part I: Lasering the stuff

A while ago I backed the amazing Primo project on Kickstarter. Right on schedule, the source files were available by the end of February.

Went to the local FabLab today to laser all the components.
Their lasercutter is second hand and has its hiccups. I ended up lasering all the components twice for best results. So it took me twice the time.

But I’m happy having everything at hand and start assembling. Lots of guidance is also available on Sjoerd Dirk’s Blog.

A weather moodlight

To create a moodlight using Arduino was always in the back of my mind. When I came accross the Spark Core on Kickstarter I also wanted it to be connected to the internet. Spark’s onboard wifi chip would make it easy to have the moodlamp reacting to outside events (apps, web sites, etc.).

In a first step I created a .NET web application that pulls weather data from OpenWeatherMap and according to the condition and temperature it would return two color codes. For example for temperature of 0 to 5 degrees celsius it would return Blue and for condition “Few Clouds” it returned Light Green.

Temperature range is from Purple (very cold) to Red (very hot) and condition is from Purple/Red for severe conditions (Thunderstorm, Hail, Tornado, etc) to White (Snow, etc) to Green (Few/No clouds) and Blue (Rain). Continue reading